trauma

Kim's Mission Trip to Ukraine

First of all I want to thank you, Tadje Orthopaedics, I don't think this trip would have been possible without your help.  I don't know if it was the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection, Meloxicam, prayers, or a combination, but my knee did great! We did a lot of traveling and walking that otherwise I would not have been able to do.  THANK YOU!

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The main reason for this trip was to distribute a shipping container of wheelchairs but because of the election that was going on in Ukraine, customs was shut down and the container was not released until today (6/23/19).  We still were able to visit many people who received wheelchairs last year.  One man had lost both his legs shortly after WWII when he was nine.  He went outside his home and stepped on a land mine.  For about 70 years he has gotten around his house pushing himself on a pallet of wood with some wheels attached.  He was so happy to be able to go outside!  Another teenage girl is now able to go to school and wants to become a lawyer.  Then another woman had not been outside for over 8 years and she loves her garden.  A lot of these folks are refugees from Crimea.  They fled with only a suitcase when Russia invaded.  Or they came from the bombed out villages along the war front that is happening now.  A lot of the families are living in a one room apartment and share a bathroom and kitchen with all the other families on that floor.   

After being in the hustle-bustle of Kiev, it was shocking to see what the public hospitals are like.  After going through the first one I felt numb.  After seeing a few more I just felt sad and angry.  The buildings are very old, some from the late 1800's.  They keep them as clean as they can and they work with what they've got.  Most of the beds and examining furniture are from the Soviet days.  Tanya, the Ukraine director of Serve Now said when she gave birth to her son nine years ago, there was no running water.  Her husband was not allowed to visit so she would go to the window, call for him, lower a string three storied down so he could tie a bottle of water to it.  Can you imagine not being able to clean up after giving birth?  Not much has changed since then.  The good news is because Sweden has social medicine, they have a warehouse full of medical furniture and equipment that Serve Now is free to take.  They have to pay the shipping cost of $15,000.  Money has been raised for a container to go in the fall and we're now working on getting another sent next spring.  The need is so great.

We also went to a Roma Gypsy Village outside of Uzhhorod  where girls are given a chance and hope to escape human trafficking.  We visited several orphanages outside of Kiev and Lviv.  One of the girls who went is an artist so we supplied brushes, paint and canvases and had art classes with the kids.  They just need a little love and hope, it goes a long way!

Even with all the need in Ukraine, the people are amazing.  They are a resilient people with a lot of heart.  They will make sure you are treated to tea and cookies when they don't have enough.  It's a country of great need that has my heart.  This only scratches the surface from this trip. 

So, again, thank you for helping make this possible.

Sincerely,

Kim R.

Please see links below for additional information regarding this mission trip.

weservenow.org

https://www.grouprev.com/servenowukraine

Providing Care in Senegal

Jacob Tadje is a hard working pre-medical student at the University of Utah with big dreams and a heart of gold. He hopes to become an orthopaedic surgeon like his dad, Dr. Tadje. Last, month, he was sponsored by Tadje Orthopaedics to participate in a humanitarian trip to Senegal. This trip was organized By the University of Utah’s Dr. Richard Ingebretsen, MD, PHD.

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Dr. Ingebretsen and 7 students spent 5 days in Senegal, and traveled to 4 different villages. The trip was eye-opening. The villages they visited are essentially clusters of huts throughout the savannah. The villages are mostly self-sustaining, and have around 200 people living in each. For many villagers, this was the first time they had spoken to a health professional. Jacob and his team members interviewed each villager to assess needs. They took vitals and treated what they could. They found many people who suffer from joint pain, malnutrition, dehydration, and head fungus. Malnutrition and dehydration are hard to solve long term because of the lack of protein and clean water sources. They were able to teach the people ways to better manage the joint pain, head fungus, and other more minor infirmities.

They found some villagers with more serious ailments, like TB, malaria, and skin cancer. They are planning to analyze the data they gathered and find ways to treat these more serious needs in future trips.

Jacob’s most rewarding experience was helping a 15-year-old boy with a hearing impairment. He was unable to hear anything farther than approximately 15 meters. Jacob looked at his ears and realized he has some major blockages. After Jacob spent some time irrigating and cleaning out the blockages, the boy’s hearing was completely restored and he was overjoyed.

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Going to Senegal was rewarding for Jacob and his team members. Jacob left with more gratitude for his way of life, especially access to clean water, a comfortable home, and modern healthcare.




Written By: Rebecca Howard

Coltin's Story

Foot vs Commercial Lawnmower

Coltin Steele grew up in Eagle, Idaho as a confident, tough farm boy with a large supportive family. In June 2010, life became especially busy for him. He was working hard mowing fields and preparing for his upcoming wedding. The day before his wedding, his time was already filled with last minute preparations when his friend asked him to take over a mowing job for him. Coltin agreed, but felt quite rushed.

As he started mowing the field with an old tractor and mower, one of the wheels became wedged against a fence post. Normally, he would have turned off the machine before unjamming the wheel, but he was in a hurry and the tractor was old and difficult to turn off. He decided he would just move the wheel quickly and be on his way. That decision changed his life. As he tried to maneuver the wheel loose, he lost his footing on the wet grass and slipped into the back of the mower. He quickly pulled himself out, but to his dismay, his shoe was completely gone and his foot was severely damaged. All he could think was, “I can’t believe this just happened. This is NOT good.”

Instantly, he started making phone calls. The phone call to his father was particularly distressing as the shock of what had just happened began to sink in. His family, along with his fiancé, Candice, and her family rushed to meet him at the hospital. When he arrived at the ER, the on-call doctor immediately assessed him and determined that his foot was not salvageable. The doctor started preparing to amputate Coltin’s leg up to his knee. His family was devastated. They promptly decided to do whatever was in their power to avoid that outcome. They knew Dr. Tadje personally, so they started trying to track him down. Dr. Tadje was headed out of town with his family, but as soon as he heard about Coltin’s predicament, he rushed into the hospital to see what he could to.

Dr. Tadje promptly took over Coltin’s care, and much to the family’s relief, had a more hopeful prognosis. He pledged that he would do everything in his power to save Coltin’s foot. Though there was no guarantee that the surgery would be successful, the skin would survive, or the foot could be functional in the future, he promised to try. Coltin’s family was overwhelmed with gratitude, and decided that anything was better than amputation. They decided to move forward with a reconstructive surgery, remaining full of cautious optimism.

Dr. Tadje expertly handled the long surgery, and was able to successfully piece Coltin’s foot back together despite how badly it had been mangled. For weeks, Dr. Tadje nursed Coltin’s foot and little by little it started to heal. The process was long, painful, and traumatizing for both Coltin and his family. He had been knocked down and his confidence was tried. However, he clung to positive thoughts like a lifeline.

Incredibly, he and Candice were able to get married just 3 months later. His healing process was far from over, but the worst was behind him. Within a year, he was selling security systems door to door. This job required him to walk all day. At first, his foot ached so badly he could hardly cope. But gradually it became stronger. Not long after, he was able to return to sport and enjoy his favorite activities again. Though in the beginning he took some guff for an embarrassing wipe out on the indoor soccer field, no one ever knew he had a compromised foot.

He and his wife now enjoy a wonderful life together. Coltin has graduated from Boise State and has a great job. He and his wife have twin toddler girls who keep them very busy. They are grateful to Dr. Tadje who opened doors that were threatening to close. They are grateful for the willingness to try and save what had been deemed unsalvageable. Coltin can’t claim to have a beautiful foot, but he has a fully functional foot that allows him to live life to the fullest. And for that, he is incredibly thankful.